University of New Brunswick

UNB Alumni News Spring 2016

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There is NO PLACE like home T here is no doubt that for Justice Joseph T. Robertson (LLB'77), UNB is home. Although his illustrious career has taken him across Canada and abroad, he always manages to return to his home pro- vince of New Brunswick. Currently, Justice Robertson finds himself in the prestigious position of jurist-in-residence at UNB's Ludlow Hall. Students and faculty at the law school are very fortunate to have access to the knowledge that he has accumulated over the course of his 23 years on the bench. And for Robertson, the feeling is mutual. "I feel incredibly honoured to be associated with UNB's faculty of law, with its diverse and highly qualified faculty and a capable and smart student body," he says. Robertson confesses that he finds himself in impressive company, and his journey back to UNB weaves an impressive story. At 20 years of age and in the midst of his second year of a bachelor of commerce program at St. Mary's University, he was accepted to the law school at JUSTICE ROBERTSON RETURNS TO UNB AS JURIST-IN-RESIDENCE Dalhousie University. However, he chose not to enrol in law school at that time because he felt too unseasoned. Instead, he found himself in Toronto with the adult education organization Frontier College. For a period of time, Robertson worked and travelled the country. Although the experience shaped his perspective on life, he came to the realization that he did not want a long-term career with the college and decided to return to formal education. He applied to only one law school, UNB, and was accepted. It was a chance to return home. While at UNB, the present-day dean John R. Williamson was one of Robertson's professors and Edward Veitch, UNB professor emeritus, was the dean. After finishing his LLB, Robertson went to the London School of Economics to pursue a master's degree. Upon completion, Dean Veitch invited Robertson to take a position at the law school. In 1979, Robertson found himself back on familiar ground, teaching at Ludlow Hall. He rose through the ranks quickly, from assistant to associate to full professor within 10 years. Then in 1992, he found himself at a crossroads. "It was my sabbatical year and I was heading off to Yale University as a visiting scholar when I received an invitation to sit on the Federal Court of Appeal," says Robertson. The stability and prestige of becoming a federal court judge influenced Robertson, and he spent eight-and-a-half years travelling to the capital cities in Canada as a Federal Court of Appeal judge. "But in 2000, my passport ran out," says Robertson, jokingly. He returned once again to his home province of New Brunswick to sit on the province's Court of Appeal. ยป ALUMNI NEWS 12

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